On-Water Rowing

100 Years Old and Still Rowing Strong: Don McCluskey

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Feb 16, 2021

Happy Birthday to Don McCluskey, who turns 100 years old on February 17, 2021!

We’re always excited to share the stories of our centenarians who demonstrate that rowing can be a lifelong sport. Don credits his longevity to a diet of red wine, Brussel sprouts and carrots, along with his daily exercise on the Concept2 RowErg. Don lives in an assisted living facility, where he continues to work out daily during COVID-19.

“During the pandemic I’ve been rowing every single day for at least 20-30 minutes, and it’s kept me healthy and sane during the lockdown. It’s one of the best exercises you can do when you’re stuck indoors. I have it set up by a window, and I don’t listen to audio while I’m rowing. It’s such a pleasure to row that I just look out the window and get my best thinking done while rowing on my Concept2.” Continue Reading ›

Newly Single: From Sweep to Scull

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May 08, 2020

Make it work: Rowing in a shell manufactured in 1985.

Many sweep rowers are finding new ways to row this spring and summer in singles, the “original” social-distance sport. The single is a great challenge—you can only blame yourself when things go poorly. But when it's going well, you can take all the credit!

I transitioned to the single after finishing my high school and college rowing careers. I took many years off staying busy with triathlon and running; I returned to the single looking to get back on the water on my own schedule.
Here are a few things I learned along the way. Continue Reading ›

What is a Power Ten?

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Jun 28, 2017

You may have heard the term “Power Ten” in reference to rowing and racing. Specifically, this term is often said by the coxswain to motivate a crew. A “Power Ten” is, traditionally, ten hard strokes of power. The coxswain often will count out each stroke for the crew. Contrary to common belief, the coxswain doesn’t yell “row” with each stroke that the athletes take. (After all, the athletes all are well aware that they are rowing.) More frequently, the coxswain is providing motivation, giving feedback, or executing a race strategy. Continue Reading ›

On Plateaus and Progress

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Mar 16, 2017

Have you ever hit a plateau—that place where your progress seems to stagnate? You’re not getting faster or fitter—in fact, it feels more like the opposite.

Sometimes this can mean that you’ve been doing too much for too long and without making sure to get enough recovery time. Recovery is a necessary part of improving fitness, so be sure to give your body some time to rest and prepare to go harder again soon.

However, a plateau may also mean that you’re not doing the right kinds of workouts for you. Recent research is pointing out several things: Continue Reading ›

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